Skilled Trade Schools in Texas

Atlanta Skilled Trade SchoolsTrade schools in Texas can help you develop job-ready skills for a diverse range of expanding industries.

Focused training in the trades can lead to all kinds of awesome opportunities, especially in Texas. The Lone Star State is continually in need of skilled professionals who can build, repair, and maintain the things that keep modern society running, such as homes, schools, businesses, and vehicles. If you're seeking a great job in a bustling industry, this is the place to be. And with the hands-on training available from trade schools across the state, you can learn how to make your mark in dynamic fields like welding, electrical technology, auto mechanics, HVAC, and more.

So start moving toward a satisfying new career. Check out the trade schools listed below or type your zip code into the search tool to find convenient programs in your part of Texas!

Reasons to Pursue a Skilled Trade in Texas



Featured Schools

Lincoln Tech

  • Grand Prairie
  • Automotive Technology
  • CNC Machining and Manufacturing
  • Collision Repair and Refinishing
  • Diesel Technology
  • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)


Altierus Career College

  • Houston Bissonnet
  • Electrician
  • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning


Brightwood College

  • Arlington
  • Brownsville
  • El Paso
  • McAllen
  • Computer Numerical Control Machinist
  • Electrical Technician
  • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration


Florida Career College

  • Houston
  • HVAC Technician


Fortis College

  • Houston South
  • HVACR


Fortis Institute

  • Houston North
  • HVAC


Tulsa Welding School

  • Houston
  • Welding Specialist
  • Welding Specialist with Pipefitting


South Texas Vocational Technical Institute

  • Corpus Christi
  • San Antonio
  • Air Conditioning Heating & Refrigeration
  • Automotive Service Technician
  • Combination Welding
  • Diesel Heavy Truck


Remington College

  • Dallas (Garland)
  • Fort Worth
  • Houston Southeast (Webster)
  • Facility Maintenance
  • Facility Maintenance and Technology
  • Heating, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning
  • Industrial Mechanics and Automated Systems


Southern Careers Institute

  • Austin, Texas
  • Harlingen, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • HVAC


Vista College

  • El Paso
  • Killeen
  • Longview
  • Construction Management
  • Construction Technology
  • Electrical Technician
  • HVAC
  • Trades Management - HVAC


Universal Technical Institute

  • Dallas/Fort Worth
  • Houston
  • Automotive Technology
  • Collision Repair & Refinish Technology
  • Diesel & Industrial Technology



3 Reasons to Pursue a Skilled Trade in Texas

Few places offer as many opportunities for skilled tradespeople as Texas. In fact, the state's building industry is booming and employers can't find enough qualified personnel for all the available jobs. In a 2017 survey, almost 70 percent of Texas contractors said they were struggling to fill craft positions. Electricians, carpenters, plumbers, truck drivers, and mechanics were all in short supply.1

With that in mind, here are three compelling reasons to get skilled trades training in the Lone Star State:

1. Rapidly Expanding Job Opportunities

There are tons of skilled trades jobs in this part of the country. Texas already employs more welders and heavy truck drivers than any other state, and it's among the top three states for employing electricians, automotive technicians, and HVAC mechanics.2 Looking ahead, the Texas construction industry is projected to grow almost 28 percent between 2014 and 2024. That means there should be more than 177,000 new jobs for tradespeople with the right skills and qualifications.3

Have a look at the projected rates of job growth for each of the following trades in Texas:4

  • Brickmasons and blockmasons—33.8 percent
  • HVAC installers and mechanics—29.4 percent
  • Electricians—28 percent
  • Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters—24.7 percent
  • Carpenters—22.6 percent
  • Heavy truck drivers—20.8 percent
  • CNC machine tool operators—20.7 percent
  • Auto service technicians—18.6 percent
  • Welders—13.4 percent

2. Reliable Incomes

You can make decent money as a tradesperson in Texas. In fact, in 2016, median salaries for welders in the Lone Star State were higher than the national median.4, 2 And some wages are on the rise: 57 percent of Texas contractors surveyed in 2017 said that labor shortages had caused them to boost base pay for hourly craft positions.1

To get an idea of the earning potential for skilled trades careers in Texas, check out this list of median salaries:4

  • Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters$44,936
  • Electricians$44,018
  • HVAC installers and mechanics$41,816
  • Welders$41,354
  • Heavy truck drivers$39,230
  • Auto service technicians—$38,452

Earnings can be even higher in certain areas of the state. For example, auto service technicians in Austin made a median salary of $44,287 in 2016, which was significantly higher than both the state and national medians. Welders in Beaumont, Odessa, and Longview all had median salaries above $50,000, as did HVAC mechanics and electricians in Amarillo.4 And those are median salaries, which means half of the people in those jobs actually earned more.

3. Plentiful Training Options

It's easy to find skilled trades training in Texas. Programs are widely available, not only in major centers like Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio, but also in smaller communities like Pharr, Longview, and Harlingen. Whether your career interests lie in welding, automotive technology, HVAC repair, or some other trade, you can find relevant training options that can bring you closer to your goal.


Begin Your Journey to Success

You have the power to take your life in a new direction. Why not begin by exploring the skilled trade schools in Texas listed above? Or discover even more convenient options by putting your zip code into the following school finder!



1 Associated General Contractors of America, "2017 Workforce Survey Results: Texas Results," website last visited on May 16, 2018.

2 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Employment Statistics, website last visited on May 16, 2018.

3 Texas Workforce Commission, Labor Market Information, Texas Long-term Industry Projections, website last visited on June 4, 2018.

4 Texas Workforce Commission, Labor Market and Career Information, Texas Wages and Employment Projections, website last visited on June 18, 2018.