Maryland HVAC Training Schools

Alt TextMaryland HVAC training schools can help you learn job-ready skills for a satisfying and stable career in the heating and cooling trade.

HVAC stands for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. We tend to take those things for granted—until something goes wrong. That's a big reason why HVAC technicians play an essential role in keeping Maryland residents comfortable indoors year round. And it's why this trade offers plenty of opportunities with long-term stability and good wages. After all, efficient climate control and safe ventilation will always be necessary.

By combining hands-on practice and focused classroom time, Maryland HVAC schools prepare students like you to enter an in-demand trade in a state with plenty to offer. Plus, these programs can open doors to many specialization and advancement options.

So why not create the secure future you want for yourself? Just enter your zip code into the school finder below to discover nearby Maryland HVAC training!

Compelling Benefits of Training to Become an HVAC Technician in Maryland



Featured Schools

Lincoln Tech

  • Columbia
  • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)



4 Compelling Benefits of Training to Become an HVAC Technician in Maryland

HVAC Technician in MarylandBy training at an HVAC school in Maryland, you can acquire the skills to enter a satisfying trade that involves maintaining heating, cooling, and refrigeration systems. (The term HVAC/R also refers to this field. The R stands for refrigeration.) No matter which type of system you specialize in, the practical work that HVAC technicians do is linked to high levels of job happiness. In fact, job satisfaction is highest in the construction and facilities services industry (an industry which includes HVAC work).1 Maryland HVAC training programs can help you enter this gratifying vocation in the state with the highest per-capita income in the nation.2

Want to learn more? Check out these great reasons for training to become an HVAC technician in Maryland:

1. Potential for Good Wages

Across the country, HVAC technicians make good money. In Maryland, workers in HVAC make $28.32 an hour, on average, which adds up to $58,900 annually. And the top 10 percent of earners make $90,240 or more. In contrast, the national average for HVAC technicians is $24.12 an hour, with an average salary of $50,160.3

As you gain qualifications and experience, your income can increase. For example, HVAC helpers make $31,200, on average, per year in the U.S.4 With additional training and qualifications, HVAC journeymen make about $62,000, on average, and the top 10 percent of master HVAC technicians earn more than $111,000.5, 6

2. Focused Paths Into the Trade

HVAC training programs can often be completed in under two years. In that short timeframe, a good program can help you acquire the knowledge and practical experience you need to maintain today's complex systems. Because of the diversity of this trade, courses can cover a lot of material, from reading about building codes to hands-on training in soldering. HVAC technicians often use computer-aided drafting (CAD) programs, so courses can also include instruction on special software and other technological tools.

Classwork at an HVAC school in Maryland may also cover:

  • Reading blueprints and other essential drawings
  • The basic principles of refrigeration
  • How to install the components of air conditioning and refrigeration systems
  • Information on working with circuitry systems
  • The importance of proper ventilation and what it requires

Having the theoretical knowledge of the processes behind heating and cooling can help you understand the importance of safety procedures. For a properly trained technician, working in HVAC is not dangerous. However, HVAC technicians do have one of the highest rates of injuries out of all vocations.7 Technicians sometimes face risks from falls when they're working in high spaces. In addition, HVAC can involve working with dangerous chemicals, so learning proper handling is essential.

One of the biggest risk factors is unsafe use of refrigerants, which are liquid or gas compounds that absorb heat. In order to understand the role of refrigerants, consider this: Most home air conditioners do not bring in fresh air from outside. Instead, refrigerants absorb heat from inside air.

All HVAC technicians who work with refrigerants must be certificated under Section 608 of the federal Clean Air Act. The certification process requires passing the EPA Section 608 certification exam, which is a written test. Most training programs cover the material you need to know in order to pass the exam, and many schools administer the test.

3. Options for Career Advancement and Specialization

You can choose from several paths if you want to advance as an HVAC technician. But no matter which route you take, you need a license to do HVAC work independently in Maryland as a journeyman or master technician. You get your HVAC license by applying through the Maryland Board of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Contractors.

An HVAC apprenticeship can give you opportunities to learn on the job while earning money. An apprenticeship is also a necessary step toward licensure. In Maryland, you apply directly to a potential employer for an apprenticeship. The Maryland Apprenticeship and Training Program can help you find sponsors or companies looking for apprentices.

An HVAC journeyman is someone who has completed an HVAC apprenticeship and passed the journeyman's exam. A journeyman can supervise less experienced workers and work without supervision.

In Maryland, it takes about three years to become a journeyman HVAC technician. You get a journeyman license by:

  • Completing three years of supervised work as a licensed HVAC apprentice
  • Working at least 1,875 hours in the previous year
  • Obtaining a score of at least 70 percent on the journeyman examination

A journeyman license can be restricted or unrestricted. With a restricted license, you can only work on forced air or hydroponic systems.

It takes at least three more years to become a master HVAC technician in Maryland. A master's license can be restricted or unrestricted. A restricted master's license enables you to work on the following types of systems:

  • Cooling
  • Heating
  • Hydroponic
  • Refrigeration
  • Ventilation

To obtain a restricted master's license, you must:

  • Have at least a journeyman's license
  • Work as a licensed journeyman under the supervision of an HVAC master for at least three years
  • Have worked at least 1,875 hours in the previous year
  • Take the master's restricted exam and pass with a score of 70 percent or higher

An unrestricted master's license enables you to work on any type of system. To obtain an unrestricted license, you must:

  • Have at least a journeyman's license
  • Work as a licensed journeyman on all types of systems under the supervision of an HVAC master for at least three years
  • Have worked at least 1,875 hours in the previous year
  • Take the master's exam and pass with a score of 70 percent or higher

You must pay a licensing fee for each level. It costs $10 to get your HVAC license as an apprentice, $20 to get a journeyman's license, and $17 for a master's license.

Within the HVAC field, you can also increase your earnings and the demand for your services by focusing on a particular area. Possible specializations include:

  • Residential buildings
  • Industrial buildings
  • Commercial refrigeration
  • Geothermal systems
  • Healthcare facilities
  • Sales

4. Plenty of Job Opportunities

Maryland has a moderate climate, but technicians are still necessary to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures year round. In fact, the outlook for HVAC technicians is strong across the state, with the number of job opportunities expected to increase by over eight percent between 2016 and 2026.8 That's a faster rate than the national average for all occupations, which is seven percent.7

The job outlook for HVAC technicians is closely tied to that of the construction industry as a whole. New buildings and older buildings undergoing renovations need new HVAC systems. As well, more people are becoming aware of the importance of maintaining those systems. Without proper maintenance, HVAC systems can be harmful to the environment and to our well-being. For example, an air conditioner is not bad for health if the system is properly maintained. But it's important to keep air conditioning ducts clean in order to prevent mold from getting into the air. Growing recognition of the need for this type of maintenance creates more opportunities for HVAC technicians.


Find a Brighter Future

Maryland HVAC training schools can help you achieve your vocational dreams in a secure trade. So it's time to take the next steps toward your goals by exploring schools near you. Just enter your zip code into the school finder below to see a list of nearby training options!



1 TINYpulse, 2015 Best Industry Ranking: Employee Engagement & Satisfaction Across Industries, website last visited on December 4, 2018.

2 Money Inc., "The 20 Richest States in the USA," website last visited on December 4, 2018.

3 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Employment Statistics, website last visited on June 20, 2019.

4 Neuvoo, website last visited on December 4, 2018.

5 PayScale, website last visited on December 4, 2018.

6 Paysa, website last visited on December 4, 2018.

7 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, website last visited on December 4, 2018.

8 Maryland.gov, Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation, "Maryland Occupational Projections - 2016-2026 - Workforce Information and Performance," website last visited on December 4, 2018.